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20130228
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as the many challenges that still face us in that country. i have spent a great deal of time thinking about what my role is in in afghanistan. let me take a few minutes to tell you a little bit about siga. is a special inspector general for afghan reconstruction. it is the only agency in the entire united states government whose mission is reconstruction in afghanistan. nothing else. we are unique. we had the unique authority to examine any project by any government agency operating in afghanistan dealing with reconstruction. we can look at the department of defense, department of state, department of justice, at any agency in afghanistan. we have the largest oversight presence on the ground in afghanistan. we have the most aggressive program. we also have the most successful record of working with afghan law enforcement in prosecuting interesting individuals in afghan courts. we are a temporary agency. we go out of existence. we sunset. when reconstruction drops below 250 million dollars. we are in the billions right now. we have some very unique contacting authorities. it allows us to get
the future on the u.s. army. after that, the white house medal of honor ceremony. >> you are watching "the communicators" on c-span. we are on location at the ces 2013 international show in las vegas. here are some interviews this week. we want to introduce you to the new president and ceo of cable blabs. what is cable labs? >> it is the cable industry on a worldwide basis. we are the source of innovation that enables the cable operators to deliver services that you're quite familiar with such as broadband, video. >> you are not a cable guy. >> no. i'm with the cable industry and products. earlier in my career, -- i'm new to cable. -- you are the yo chief technology officer at -- >> correct. >> there in the -- my role at hp, we focused a lot on what the people do with the technology in their homes and in their hands and on their desk. being able to look at that from end to end. an innovator by back and. it is about coming up with those great i years and translating those two have high impacts. >> what are some products that you are excited about? >> we have been looking a
us off we have the ftc commissioner who was sworn in on a term that expires in 2018. she focuses on fcc issues, including privacy. she served at the commission for -- she focuses on f.t.c. issues, including privacy. she would get us started off with a recap on what the ftc is working on. >> i am delighted for the opportunity to provide some into the three stocks on the topic of this panel, facial recognition technology. i will be speaking from the perspective of consumers. the mission is to prevent business practices that are anti-competitive, deceptive, or on fred to consumers without unduly burdening legitimate -- except if our -- be sacked if -- deceptive. first, i would like to note that my comments on my own and do not necessarily represent respect the lives of other ftc commissioners. i cannot miss the opportunity to quote the line, "john anderton you could, you say guinness right now. -- use a guiness. now.." companies are already deploying facial recognition technology in a wide variety of contexts. some are more sophisticated than others. there has been a lot of coverage
by giving us a snapshot of the samsung corporation. >> it is now the largest technology company in the world by sales. we cover components all the way through to finished goods like home appliances, televisions and smartphones. so you will see a whole range of products at the booth where we are showing audio systems, home appliances, televisions, the whole range of electronic products. >> what is your position at samsung, for what are you response snble >> i'm responsible for our corporate strategy in north america america and looking at all of our corporate strategies across that. so overseeing all the product areas and strategies. >> you spent quite a few years in korea, correct? >> yes. why are you now in the snates >> probably they got tired of me and said i need a breather. but it's interesting when you've been in the headquarters. you've seen global responsibility but looking at narrower product lines. but in coming to the u.s., i can look at all the product lines in one geographic market. it's a different way of look k at the business. much more in the trenches than in the headquarter
use of electronic of records. i think it has the potential to be a game changer for them. their expectations are now beginning to change, too, in this transition phase. we saw that only a fairly small percentage of consumers have on- line access to their medical records. it is about 26% of people who also had said in ehr. for those that did, their views were very different and their experiences were very different. there were more engaged in their care and more motivated to do something to improve their care and they felt more confident in their clinician's ability to manage their care with them and began to really set up more of a partnership constructs. it will be very interesting to see end stage 2, where the requirement will be applicable -- applicable the chicken go on line and you can download and you can transmit and i think that will be interesting. from the consumer viewpoint, we are at a point where they are experiencing some tangible benefits. it is early in the program and that is fabulous. i think what is about to happen will the transformational. >> there is
>> first of all, i would like to say that korea, south korea is the most important neighbor for us. and the president-elect, i have had -- i have met her twice and i have had a meal with her. my grandfather was best friends with her father. at the same time, the president was someone very close with japan, obviously. but we do have the territorial issue between japan and the united states. japan and korea, sorry. even with those issues, the economic relationship is very strong. the people to people exchange is very strong. the ties with japan and korea is something that cannot be severed. i think the relationship that we have which south korea is extremely important, the cooperation we can achieve between these two countries. we can try to work to resolve these issues and have a good relationship with three out. -- with korea. we are planning to dispatch the vice prime minister and finance minister to participate in the ceremony on the 5th of february. >> thank you for a speech with so many good sound bites. are there things you would like to have the united states say or do? have
. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead and increase harvest and feed the whole world. sometimes these innovations come from the most advanced science. other times they are simple steps and ideas that come from looking at and listening closely to the problem. all of them can break down barriers to food security. it can allow us to allow new paths of progress. -- plow entirely new pass to progress. we need those new pathways forward. take a look at a few recent headlines. "drought and mississippi impacts everything from livestock to deer." "food shortages could force the world into vegetarians." "patent endings raises new biotech issues." "global crop production shows signs of stagnant." "could climate change be al qaeda's best friend in africa?" i could go on. when i think of the factors that make up the perfect storm, i'm reminded of what mark twain reportedly observed. by land, they're not making it anymore. i wish twain was right. the truth is, global warming is making less. we need to do more land that we still have. every year 7 billion of us on earth use th
are delighted to have the prime minister here. this is an exciting time for us. we know of his leadership through the years and we are really delighted to have him here. we are excited that he can be with us today. i would especially like to say words of thanks for our colleagues. we are delighted to have you here, a senior advisor to the prime minister is here. the deputy chief and cabinet secretary. the ambassador is here, one of my bosses. i have to recognize him. a great service for america and japan, we are delighted to have you here. and the governor from alaska, he is our closest state to japan and has the keenest interest in japan. it is wonderful to have you here, governor. there is a new word in washington, the new economics that prime minister abe is bringing to japan. we have to get ourselves started again and i think that is exactly what he is doing in japan. i would like to take a second, talk about the foreign-policy agenda. japan's foreign policy going forward to protect freedom of thought, expression, and speech in the asia-pacific. can you think of anything more importan
in your home state. that is the way it used to work and we can make it work that way again. there are a number of things we have to do immediately. we may disagree on how to dress them but not the need for them to be addressed. each of you are making different decisions you are grappling with it. i do not think there is much much difference. i'm not mad a governor from the time of implementing the recovery act and on now who does not think we have to do something about our infrastructure. there is very little disagreement on the need too build an education that has such immense possibilities for our people. most of these issues were united by more than what divides us. these all intersect at a place where both the state and federal governments engage. we are going to have to work together. they overlap, in many cases. we will have our differences. we should all agree that the united states has to have the highest percentage of college graduates of any nation in the world. everyone disagrees. some of you governors have led the way an early education and the consequences for
2000 specificly named by make and model firearms used for hunting or sporting purposes. second, the bill will not take away any weapons that are owned today. anyone who says otherwise is simply trying to deceive you. finally, it would ban the future sale or transfer of these magazines, including the manufacturing, implementation, or possession. let me address for a moment the charge that the assault weapons ban such as this are unconstitutional. the original federal assault weapons ban and it was challenged repeatedly on every grounds the opponents to come up with, including the second amendment, the ninth amendment, the commerce clause, the due process clause, equal protection, and being a bill of the chamber. each and every time these challenges were rejected and the ban was upheld, including by the fourth, 6th, 9th, and d.c. circuit. the supreme court subsequently recognizes the individual rights to gun ownership in the district of columbia. however, that decision clearly stated, "the right secured by the second amendment is not unlimited." justice scalia, the author of that
chester, economist and behavioral scientists talked about the restrictions on the use, sale and advertising of marijuana and tobacco. this is an hour and 50 minutes. >> some of this is related to licensing and regulations have discussed before. alex, you will go third here so that you have a warning. first we will welcome -- first we will welcome frank chaloupka back. >> thanks. we will move quickly through this. these are things i can spend hours talking about. smoke-free air policies. these of the primary restrictions on tobacco use that we have. these are generated by try to protect non-smokers from exposure to tobacco smoke. the sciences have advanced and we understand what the harmful consequences of second-hand smoke are for non smokers. this is something that was first hinted at in the 1972 surgeon general's report. there was discussion about how harmful chemicals would be harmful to non smokers as well. this is the start of the nonsmokers rights union in the u.s. we did have some policies on the books for a long time in some states. many laws against smoking in food
invasions or violent assault because they had a gun to protect themselves. most of us are glad it ended well for you. those are the two bookends. you mentioned, captain kelly, and i appreciate you being here, appreciate your comments about you and your wife being reasonable people. i do not doubt that one bit. the question is, am i an unreasonable american if i oppose this bill? am i an unreasonable american to believe the constitution says guns commonly used by the population for legitimate purposes? i do not want to own a gun to attack my government. that is not what i think a legitimate purpose is. let's talk about a real world incident that happened in loganville, georgia in january 2012. one bullet in the hands of a mentally ill person or a convicted felon is one too many. six bullets in the hands of a mother protecting her twin 9 year-olds may not be enough. so i have a chart here. at the top is the 38 revolver. on the right is a 9 millimeter pistol. that holds 15 rounds. does everyone on the panel agree that a convicted felon should not have either one of those guns? does everybody ag
can tweet us. we have 35, is already on facebook. and you can always e-mail us at urnal@cspan.org legislators step up for paid sick leave. some pretty 9% of private-sector workers are not entitled to paid time off when they fall ill according to the bureau of labor statistics. low-wage and part-time workers, particularly those who work at small firms or who work in restaurants, are among the least likely to get paid sixth time. to change that, democratic lawmakers and their allies in maryland, washington, and massachusetts, and cities including new york, philadelphia, and portland, or try to advance measures that would make a sixth time a legal requirement for most firms. in congress, senator tom harkin plans to reintroduce a federal paid sick leave bill this spring. some employers contend the measure has harmed workers with company wage and increase -- which by prompting cuts in wages or increases. we are asking you about the federal government and if there should be a federal mandate when it comes to paid sick days. here is how you can reach out to us, on our phone lin
to bless you and your volunteers for their service. [applause] we have another very special guest with us tonight, a hard- core rock star. the commanding general of one of the greatest military institutions. if you do not believe me, too were it yourself. do not mess with this general. the marine corps has been with us since 1950 and they have trained there for every major conflict of the 20th and 21st century. we are so proud of our marine corps. we are so proud that the most impressive training facility in the world is located here in south carolina. and we are proud that general reynolds has found our state to be her home. [applause] i would now ask that you indulge me a brief moment of personal privilege. when we at the family started this administration one of the biggest challenges was moving into a house that was a museum. a wonderful, beautiful, historic building. a museum nonetheless. as a mom, my biggest challenge was to make that house into a home for all of us. we were blessed to have a family that welcomed us and understood the games our kids would play a putting wigs on stat
and at the same time prevent us from making those investments. what are those weaknesses? a tax system that works against us, not for us. a workforce that isn't as trained and skilled as it needs to be. an education system that isn't as efficient and rigorous as the world demands. a population whose health ranks among the worst in the nation. and a heavy sword called the public pension unfunded liability that dangles by a thread above us. ladies and gentlemen, if we solve those challenges, kentucky will lead the nation out of this recession. if we don't, we'll begin slipping backward, and our progress will fade away. can go either way. the good news is we know what we have to do. but delay could be deadly. and my friends, it over the past year, in national debates about the fiscal cliff and other issues, you've heard warnings about "kicking the can down the road." it's almost become a national slogan, and yes, that phrase is a clichÉ. but phrases become clichÉs because they ring with truth and here in kentucky -- right here, right now -- that clichÉ rings true. we have to stop putting off unco
for television. season one begins monday night at 9:00 a.m. -- at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> u.s. army chief of staff general raymond odierno says the greatest threat facing our nation is the fiscal uncertainty and potential budget cut -- but it sure call. hort falls. he made these remarks at the brookings institution. this is just over an hour. >> good morning, everyone, and on behalf of brookings and our center for 21st century security, we're honored to have the chief of staff of the army, general ray odierno, to speak. you are aware of the challenges of the budget process and our future military planning as well as current operations. no one could be more distinguished and a more thoughtful person to discuss these matters than general odierno, who is a friend of brookings and the broader defense community for a long time, and he has been a distinguished servant in our nation's military and defense throughout that time. he took the fourth infantry division to iraq and presided over its operation, directed its operations in the first year of the iraq war. then he returned as the mult
with the genome project and he talked with us about brain mapping and what might happen in the future coming up tomorrow, we have a shortened program because our coverage of the national governors' association. we will start at 7:00. it will feature todd zwillich and lesley clark. she serves as the white house correspondent. we will speak of the latest views on sequestration. we will talk about the chances of a deal to ward off the cuts. at 8:45 a.m., a chance for you to learn about the role and responsibilities of the top leadership position in both chambers of congress. we will talk about what is like to be a leadership person, what their responsibilities are. you will get to learn more about that discussion starting at age 40 5:00 a.m. hour "newsmakers" program starts at 11:00. bob goodlatte is the chairman of the house judy's jury committee. this is part of our weekly series. -- judiciary committee. this is part of our weekly series. you may have seen our previous interview earlier this morning with our guest from delaware. the national governors' association is in town. our coverage starts
of the maryland general assembly, there is more that unites us than divides us. this year, one of those things is the mighty, mighty baltimore ravens. [cheers and applause] my goodness. also bipartisan agreement. look, all of us are familiar with the ravens story, but their are also a number of remarkable people who are with us. i want to share a few of their stories with all of you. first, one of our nation's leading minds and most prominent advocates of science, technology, and engineering, math and education, some of you know them as a member of the school state board. later this week president obama will be awarding him the national medal of science for his achievement in physics. dr. james gates. [applause] two years ago, and that just two years ago, this woman has turned around a workplace into a full-time job. please welcome janice in caroline county and melissa jones harris. [applause] within the heart of every individual is a spirit and a dignity that yearns to be recognized. 12 months ago outside, the officially recognized for the first time in 380 years, the people in a ceremony tha
that will cause us to make some of these difficult decisions over the next seven months, because of this bermuda triangle of uncertainty that we have had in the budget, specifically in fiscal year 2013. in the longer term, we have a bigger issue. i want to first remind everybody that sequestration is not the first cuts we have taken in the military. in 2010, we took $200 million in cuts on the secretary's issues, followed up by the budget control act which directed another $487 billion worth of cuts in our defense spending. we are now just beginning to implement that almost $800 billion worth of cuts now. we have not quite seeing those that. we have just begun to see the impacts. on top of that, with sequestration, we will take an additional $500 billion worth of cuts in the department of defense, so we're now up to $1.2 trillion worth of cuts since 2010. this does not include the reduction in our spending of overseas contingency accounts, which also now has to be -- some of it will have to be woven into our base budget, such as ied detection equipment, which will cause another shortfall in the
they could do to reassure the u.s. and the international community, it seems to be another clear implication of what you are saying is that the u.s. takes further steps to support the syrian opposition it would be read as strengthening their view that we are out to get them. >> we are out to get assad. are we ipso facto out to get iran? are we going to protect the allies, which is something i think we need to do despite the fact that they have a bad record? no one in syria has a sterling record, but it think we need to give them the opportunity to say there is a news syria forming. do they want to be engaged? what is the relationship there? i'm not very optimistic that we could get the iranians on board, but maybe you could find a way to make them increasingly less relevant. do they equate that with a regime change? maybe. we have to be aware of it. i think that's a stretch. i think the iranians could see, what i say is increasing value in the opportunity to talk if they begin to understand that the region is not moving totally in their direction all the time, which i think indeed is the cas
he saw and did. what he recommended was focused. means related to end us. 0-- ends. we are emerging from some of the longest wars in american history. victory never determined by when we could win, but when could we leave. extrication is not the metric that you want to evaluate the performance and behavior of the most consequential power on earth. barack obama is the great extricate her. his role is to get americans out of conflicts, not get them into new ones. cruel and unforgiving assessment. >> thank you, aaron. [applause]>> we will take it from your rebuttal. we will now have a three-minute rebuttal from liana. we will leave it to josh to do that rebuttal. >> i will say couple of things quickly. first, with all due respect to the presidency, it is not up to him or the president what history provides. history presents challenges, whether he wants to do the great indicator -- it is not up to him. history will operate the way it does. we will assess the various challenges on their own. secondly, i understand the problem of knowledge and ignorance and personal and political life and
, a discussion about the use of enhanced interrogation techniques in the hunt for osama bin laden, after that, the moderator for the 2012 presidential and vice president of the eight talk about their roles in the impact of twitter and other social media. now, a former cia officials for the george w. bush administration defend the use of enhanced interrogations' in the search for osama bin laden. michael hitt and joins former cia counsel who provides the bush administration on interrogations'. . and jose rodriguez. the american enterprise institute hosts this 90 minute of that. >> good morning. welcome to this morning's panel. separating fact from fiction. i am a member of a task force on detention and interrogation policy. captain bigelow's recent film sparked controversy. recentryn bigelow's film sparked controvery. its graphic depiction of eight torture. for the most part, the outrage has come from the left. you are a conservative like me, when you see the washington left with the hollywood left, your temptation is to sit back and destroyed a fight. -- and enoy the fight. that is why many o
to go. we will start with 10 minutes from each team. leon will talk about why the u.s. should do more in the syria. that we will hear from josh and aaron on why the u.s. should not go any further. then the leon and bob will rebut their argument. i will begin a discussion by grilling the one or both of the teams on their arguments. the other side will have a chance to respond. each team will have three minutes to answer questions. their answers strike -- somebody could come and uniform and escort you out. let's get to it with bob k. again and leon on why the u.s. should be doing more in syria. >> thank you. thank you senator john mccain who is a national hero for the work he has been doing in the senate all of these years. i just use up some of my time, but it is worth it. let me stipulate first of all, the united states cannot do everything everywhere. we cannot involve ourselves even when there are humanitarian crises. we cannot always involve ourselves. there are limitations on our capabilities, our resources, and our attention. the question really is, does syria rise to the level t
house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote that authorized drones or some other counter-terrorism operations to basically killed u.s. citizens overseas. and it talks about one set of circumstances. it looks like it is talking specifically about a particular country or type of country or certain type of leaders or terrorist organizations and under what conditions it would be ok to use this type of lethal force. it does not talk about drones per say, but it appears that is what they are referring to. if it does not rule out using its under other circumstances. it
stimulus plan. we are asking for you to give us your view. welcome to this addition of the washington journal. we want to know from you what is your view of the economic recovery the president talked about four years ago. here are the numbers -- you can also reach out to us via social media. the address is on the screen. for twitter, the address is cspanwj. pan.book.com/c-spas or you can e-mail journal@c- span.org. we begin by talking about the speech that the president made four years ago in elkhart, indiana. it is part of the nbc news elkhart project. we will talk more about that. we want to talk to you about your view of the economic recovery. our first call comes from randy and new hampshire on our line for independence. caller: how are you guys this morning? things are going downhill fast. we are in this huge crisis. the recession is going on and on. we are lucky that we are not in worse shape in a severe depression. the banks keep doing business. things need to change fast. host: what kind of work do you do? caller: i am a diesel mechanic by trade but i now go to school. i go to
opportunity for us. >> the future of consumer technology with samsung vp for strategy david steel from this year's ces show. >> president obama and congressional leaders spoke about faith in public life at this year's fellowship foundation national prayer breakfast in washington. the national prayer breakfast dates back to 1953 with president eisenhower. otheralso hear from guests. this is 90 minutes. ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states and mrs. michelle obama. ♪ [applause] >> a good morning. we have had a wonderful time together to discuss issues and had a joyful time together. we thank you for your attention. mark, is overwhelming -- you can all have a seat, i'm sorry. please have a seat. >> you never know. >> it is overwhelming to think of the pathway that each person took to get to this event today. some from little villages halfway around the world, and some from the 12 blocks away. thank you all for coming. this year's event, which has taken place for 61 years now, began with a group of people who happen to be leaders wanting to get togeth
. >> on the next "washington journal, historian and author douglas brinkley talks about the second terms of u.s. presidents and windy ginsburg from the u.s. research office discusses the perks and benefits of the former presidents of the united states including pensions, offices and libraries. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. next, a rally for climate change from earlier today on the national mall. speakers included rhode island senator sheldon witehouse, van jones and ago tris rosario dawson. the rally was organized by self groups including the sierra club, 350.org and the hip-hop caucus. this is about an hour and a half. ♪ snoor somebody make some noise! [cheers and applause] >> come on. come on. you can do better than that. this is like calcutta. we have to get warm. give it up right now. y'all are ready. y'all are ready. if you say no, make some noise! [cheers and applause] >> let's do it, wherever you are, give us some music! come on! >> oh, yeah, let's go! come on. if i say no, you say no. no. no. pipeline. here we go. here we go. p let's go! no! >> no. >> no. >
and separate fact from fiction. today, we have a distinguished panel to help us do that. three veterans. there were directly involved in the cia integration and detention program. also the hunt for osama bin laden. mike is the former director of the national security agency and the director of the intelligence agency. i got to know him back in 2006, when i was asked to write the president's speech revealing the existence of the interrogation program. he was very kind to give me access to all the intelligence and introduced me to the men and women who conducted the interrogation. but he is not only one of the smartest people i know. he is one of the most compelling witnesses. when he came into the office, the program had been suspended. he was not involved in its initial creation. he conducted a partial assessment. he gathered all the information and had to advise the president whether or not to restart it. he concluded he could not advise the president not to have an interrogation program. we will ask him to explain why that is. jose rodriguez is the former director of the cia service.
are paying them. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. someone has got to do a cost benefit analysis. can you imagine the amount of money we have spent fooling around with these contractors that weren't getting the job done? can you imagine the time we have spent on this and the money that has been spent? i would like for you, general, to talk about the cost benefit of putting marines in our embassies and why in the world this is hard for us to get our arms around and where is the analysis that shows us we are saving any money. >> just to react briefly to what would be necessarily a much longer conversation. the marines are not -- that's not their role or what they do for the nation. could it be at some point potentially? i would hate to think we would make that decision based on costs but it would require a longer conversation. >> i guess my point is god forbid we have something happen in kabul. this would look like child's play if you look at the history of what's gone on in terms of the guard force at kabul. and you know, i want to be to rt would be necessarily a
governor booth gardner presented us with a challenge heading into washington's second century. he said "either we respond to international competition, or we doom ourselves and our children to a dramatic slide to second- rate status in the world." we chose to answer this challenge, with a unique formula for international success that has made us who we are today, with businesses, entrepreneurs, state government, all working together. now it's 24 years later. i have a new job, a new vantage point, and the world looks much different. a once vibrant and growing state economy was brought low by the gross irresponsibility by those on wall street. as a result we have suffered 4 years of recession, with almost 300,000 people in washington looking for work. too many of our families are on the brink of losing their home. parents lie awake at night wondering how they can provide for their children's future. but we remain an optimistic state, a visionary state and an innovative state. time has not dimmed and the recession has not diminished our thirst for innovation and our talent for technologic
. there is no embargo when the set -- the gresko -- the practice is over, except that c-span has agreed not to use video of the session from least two hours after the breakfast and to give everyone a bit of time to file if you wish. if you have questions, i will call on one and all happily. i will be the ambassador to -- an opportunity to -- i will give the ambassador an opportunity to make opening comments. >> thank you for hosting this. it is a long overdue exercise and i'm very happy to be here this morning. and to be given what i call a unique opportunity to address issues that we have been looking at. and i know that some in the media have been falling in the past many years. -- following in the past many years. yes, i have good reason to believe i am in danger, but i hope that we come out of this not in flames, shall we say. my bio is very interesting, but i have spent over a year in being a spokesperson for the pakistan people's party as well as in government as a minister. i resigned about a while ago. it is not difficult for me to be boring for an hour and not give you something. my intent is t
for talking with us this morning, dr. torrey. he's the founder of the treatment advocacy center. we now go to a live hearing of the senate judiciary committee. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> i want to thank the senator pat leahy for giving us the opportunity to have this hearing today. we are pleased to have such a large audience for the hearing. it demonstrates the importance of this issue. at the outset, i want to note that the rules of the senate prevent outbursts or clapping or demonstrations of any kind during these hearings. there was so much interest in today's hearings that we had to expand opportunity for the audience in an adjoining room. the overflow room is 226 of the dirksen building. i will make opening remarks and give ranking member cruz the same opportunity and then welcome our first witness. we are here to discuss a critically important issue, maybe a very basic question. we venerate in this country are committed to the life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness of those who live in amer
cruz of texas. thank you for joining us at this committee hearing, as well as my other colleagues. i also want to thank senator pat leahy for giving us the opportunity to have this hearing today. we are pleased to have such a large audience for the hearing. it demonstrates the importance of this issue. at the outset, i want to note that the rules of the senate prevent outbursts or clapping or demonstrations of any kind during these hearings. there was so much interest in today's hearings that we had to expand opportunity for the audience in an adjoining room. the overflow room is 226 of the dirksen building. i will make opening remarks and give ranking member cruz the same opportunity and then welcome our first witness. we are here to discuss a critically important issue, maybe a very basic question. we venerate in this country are committed to the life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness of those who live in america. we also guaranteed under our bill of rights the right to bear arms. can we make these two consistent? can we protect a person's right to own a firearm and still say
of us will get 100% of what we want. democrats, they've got to, you know, make some tough choices too. democrats like me, we've said we're prepared to make some tough cuts and reforms, including the programs like medicare. but if we're willing to compromise, then republicans in the house have to compromise as well. that's what democracy's about. that's what this country needs right now. so -- [applause] let me just make one last point, by the way, for those who are following this. lately some people have been saying, well, maybe we'll just give the president some flexibility. he can make the cuts the way he wants them, and that way it won't be as damaging. you know, the problem is when you're cutting $85 billion in seven months, which represents over a 10% cut in the defense budget in seven months, there's no smart way to do that. there's no smart way to do that. you don't want to have to choose between -- let's see, do i close funding for the disabled kid or the poor kid? do i close this navy ship yard or some other one? when you're doing things in a way that's not smart, you can't g
institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., february 13, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable doug collins to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 3, 2013, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate . the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr
on weapons designed for military use? >> i believe it is possible to craft a law consistent with the second amendment and heller decision that would be constitutional. >> 20 co-sponsors and myself have drafted this legislation. i would like to ask that you take a look at it, and if you have problems with it, did you let us know. >> i will, senator. >> thank you very much, and thank you, mr. chairman. >> senator cornyn. >> thank you, mr. chairman. mr. heaphy, thank you for your service as a u.s. attorney in for being here today. want to join the other members of the committee in expressing my gratitude to the family members who are here today who have lost a loved one as a result of an act of violence. i believe we owe it to you not to engage in tokenism or symbolic acts, but rather, to try the best we can to address the causes and to come up with solutions, and at the same time respect the rights of law- abiding citizens to keep and bear arms is protected by the second amendment. i believe is possible for us to do that. but i also believe it is important for us to look at the laws already o
placed us in the center of the new industrial we now have it within our grasp at this moment. to use our enterprise, imagination, and faith in ourselves up to form a new pennsylvania. this is our response ability. thank you. may god bless you, at our commonwealth, and the united states of america. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> there is a chapter at the end. we talk about a meteor hitting the earth. this time there is a top of a meteoric destroying the earth. one of lincoln's friends is certain it is going to happen. lincoln chide him about it 12 years later. he tries hard to get this job. he fails. it is a good thing. not counting he is the republican party are moving this. he probably never becomes president. he went back to his hotel room. he cannot move. he thought it was the end of his career. as we all know, history has something better in store. he ends up leaving washington. he went as though something happen. >> he arrived in washington in 1847. today at 7:00 p.m. eastern. >> c-span is like toda
of the u.s. capitol the sunday. the nation's governors continue their winter meeting on sunday. congress returns tomorrow with the senate. chuck hagel is expected to be the next defense secretary. a boat could happen early as tuesday. and those automatic budget cuts -- budget cuts begin to kick in. on the sunday, often during, 24, we will begin with the topic of health care. specifically, medicaid. is it a good idea? we want to get your thoughts on all of this. 202 is the area code. 585-3881 for the republicans. 202-585-3880 is our democratic line. you can also join us at facebook or send us an e-mail. a couple of issues dealing with health care and the elderly. a cover story, "increased -- a crisis in plain sight." and this cover story from time magazine called, "why medical billsa re killing us." and from "the new york times," -- there is the story of one of a number of republican governors -- he said ohio would reverse this decision if the government failed to cover all the cost of the expansion. here are some details for ohio -- last year the supreme court ruling that they have the a
direction as what we should be attempting to accomplish. this should be an issue that does not divide us but brings us together. i hope that is the case in 2013. i very much appreciate the consumer electronics association hosting this tremendous trade show. i have been able to wander the floor this morning looking at the latest ideas and examples and innovation. it strikes me this is the area of the economy that has the grid -- greatest potential of growing and has the most to offer as far as job creation and it is the part of the country -- the economy that is least likely to be regulated by what happens in washington, d.c.. it is clear to me the evidence is that with less government intervention, the likelihood of innovation and economic success only increases. that is a concept that i think needs to garner greater support across the country. i got interested in to this issue of entrepreneurship as a frustrated member of the senate. only a short time into my time in washington as a senator, it became clear we were accomplishing so little. one of the motivating factors for my interest i
many good friends. let me start off by thinking everybody at del sol high school for hosting us. [applause] go dragons. let me especially thing your outstanding principal. [applause] there are all kinds of notable guests here but i just want to mention a few. first of all, our outstanding secretary of the department of homeland security, and janet napolitano. [applause] our wonderful secretary of the interior ken salazar. [applause] former secretary of labor, hilda solis. [applause] two of the outstanding members of the congressional delegation from nevada, steve and gina. [applause] your own mayor, carolyn goodman. [applause] we also have some mayors who flew in because they know how important issue we are to talk about today is. maria from arizona. qassim from atlanta, georgia. rick from phoenix, arizona. and ashley from fresno, calif. [applause] than all of you are here, as well as some of the top labor leaders in the country. we are so grateful. outstanding business leaders are here as well. of course, we have wonderful students here. [applause] those of you have a seat, fee
're using economic tools to address strategic challenges, for example, in afghanistan, because along with the security transition and political transition, we are supporting an economic transition that boosts the private sector and increases regional economic integration. it's a vision of transit and trade connections we call the new silk road. a related lever of power is development and we are helping developing countries grow their economies not just through traditional assistance but also through greater trade and investment, partnerships with the private sector, better governance and more participation from women. we think this is an investment in our own economic future and i love saying this because people are always quite surprised to hear it, seven of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world are in africa. other countries are doing everything they can to help their companies win contracts and invest in emerging markets. other countries still are engaged in a very clear and relentless economic diplomacy. we should, too, and increasingly, we are. and make no mistake, there
been an important opportunity for us to really put some considered thought into the proposal. what you have in front of you is better than airplane reading. there are some suggestions in this energy 2020 document that people will look at and they will argue and they will say -- that is one person's view. that is true, that is true. but while we are trying to do is not give you a legislative package starting with initiatives that we are going to kind of clicked off as we move forward. this is really designed to be a discussion blueprint. we want to try to change the conversation. one of the reasons we have to think about changing the conversation is because the energy paradigm has really shifted. think about where we were one decade ago. it was all about scarcity, shortages, and how much dependent we were on foreign sources for our oil. fast forward to where we are today. those once thought of import terminals are looking to the export terminals. we have made considerable gains in terms of our own energy independence, to the point where it is no longer just a slogan that we are talking
used was one of the best we had ever encountered. >> so mr. al-awlaki is by not an american citizen by where anyone in america would be proud? >> he was part of al qaeda, and it was his determination to kill americans on behalf of al qaeda. >> thank you. is it true that in the last four years the fbi has arrested 100 people, either planning, conspiring, or trying to commit a terrorist attack on this nation? >> yes, they have arrested a lot of people. >> that is because of good, sound intelligence. i think what people forget is that they will kill us if they can and it is extraordinarily difficult if you cannot get into where they were hiding. would it have been possible to have arrested mr. al-awlaki where he was in the yemen? >> we work very closely with yemenis to see if we can arrest individuals. if we can, we want to do that because it is valuable for us. any actions taken in concert with the yemeni government are done in terms of any types of strikes we might engage there with them, are done only because we do not have the ability to bring those individuals into custody. >> tha
will be very difficult. host: why? guest: [inaudible] host: when they use the word lifeline, what does that say to you? >> guest: that is the difficulty. how they get fuel and structure, to the local police. a lot of these local units are in small villages and difficult to get to. they may be in trouble and they -- and maybe because they're out this is the firstrefus indication of problems. caller: i am calling for mississippi. [indiscernible] i do not want them over there. i cannot understand why -- what they need to do there. just think what that were due to our borders for education of our children. it does not seem fair and all that we have to go over there and you soldiers for this purpose. guest: that is the decision that the policymakers will have to make. why we're there or how long we stay, are decisions above my pay grade. i do not avoided but my job is to look that now that we're there, are we spending the money well? the policy decision is for congress and the senior executive branch. host: sounds like our tax dollars will be going to afghans for decades. guest: the tweet raises a g
. >> i hope you will share the sense of urgency many of us feel about this situation and about the dire predicaments many of those courageous -- predicament that many of those courageous fighters who are opposing the barbaric regime that the president assad regime has become. i urge you to present your recommendation to this committee as soon as possible. i hope more can be done militarily to deprive president assad of his superiority where he has in the air and his forces on the grounds that he is using to slaughter of the citizens of his own country. >> yes, sir. >> thank you, mr. chair. my time is expired. my thanks to each of you for your extraordinary service in the past. thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank general austin and general rodriguez and their families for your extraordinary service to our country. i want to follow up on what senator blumenthal discussed. we worked on this no contacting with the inari provision that has given authority to d.o.d. to cut off in may -- contacting authority provision that has given d.o.d. authority to cut off funds that go
spring. for those of us in uniform, we are very much appreciated so we can avoid the use of force but we remain ready to do so if necessary. you have moved diplomacy into the 21st-century. your recognize there are limits to hard power. you use both hard power and soft power. you utilize social media and town halls. you have been one of the staunchest supporters of the military more than any secretary of state in my career. i expect you will slow down a bit. maybe you can add a tony award for your grammy award. would you join me? >> hillary clinton will be receiving an award. secretary hillary clinton, distinguished herself by superior service while serving as a secretary of state from 21, january 2009 to 1 february, 2013. she has provided outstanding support of all operational efforts of the joint military forces rolled wide, executing her smart power strategy of combining military strength with capacity and global economics, aid, and technology. she enhanced the role of diplomatic and defense initiatives in the international arena. capitalizing on this effort, it she instituted a diplom
us an email. what is the definition of sequestration? one is this -- it is that fiscal policy procedure adopted by congress to deal with the federal budget deficit. that is according -- some news over the last 24 hours as the president reaches out to republican leaders in the house and senate. a phone conversation between the president and republican leaders mitch mcconnell and john boehner. our guest follows the story for the hill newspaper. what news came out of these phone conversations? guest: not much from the press secretary or congressional leaders. they have been very tight- lipped. it is interesting to say that things do seem to be heating up little bit. congress will come back next week -- it is unlikely either version, republican or democrat, of the bill will pass. and will set up for a dramatic week that is unlikely to come towards a solution on this issue. host: how engaged is the president on all this? there have been discussions that he is on the campaign trail, campaigning on sequestration, but not meeting face-to-face with congressional leaders. guest: that ha
. following the consequences of the drought last year, the president directed us to create a drought task force, made up of all federal agencies, to try to mitigate the impacts and effects of drought. that led us to begin thinking at usda about steps we can take to help producers during a difficult time. we took a series of steps to try to mitigate the consequences. we opened up crp land, and changed premium payments, things of that nation -- that nature. it also got us thinking -- were there other steps, other things we should be doing, to provide help and assistance? it occurred to us perhaps we should be focused more acutely on the need to encourage multi- cropping through the united states, in order for us to do a better job of conservation, to create biomass that could be a revenue source, and to potentially allow us to conserve precious water resources, which would in turn allow us to get through these drought circumstances in a more favorable circumstance. we have begun a process of looking at ways in which we could provide assistance. you will be fortunate to hear from a fellow by
and state governments can use to respond to them as well as prevent them. among the speakers, richard clarke, and the chief information security officer for the shoe company, zap those -- zappo's. >> good afternoon.i am governor brian sandoval. this meeting is called to order. thank you for joining us. the books were sent to governors in advance and include the agenda and background information. the proceedings are open to the press and all attendees. if you all please take a moment to ensure that your cell phones and other electronic devices are silenced. i would like to compliment governor o'malley. it is a privilege and an honor to serve with you, sir. before moving on to state and cyber security, we will begin with an executive briefing on the nationwide safety of a broadband network. last year congress passed legislation to reallocate the radio spectrum to public safety and provide $7 billion to fund construction of the first inoperable broadband network for public safety. this is intended to modernize communications by giving first responders reliable access to broadband technologies l
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